Importantance Of Growth Mindset

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Education provides students with the opportunity to learn new things not only academically, but about themselves. One of the aspects that developed overtime was the concept of the growth mindset. Originally develop by psychologist Carol Dweck, the growth mindset enables people to “believe that their most basic abilities can be developed through dedication and hard work-brains and talent are just the starting point” (Partnership, 2013). Additionally, “this view creates a love of learning and a resilience that is essential for great accomplishment” (Partnership, 2013). This mindset doesn’t just happen inside the classroom but in the surrounding outside environment.

“Students who embrace growth mindsets—the belief that they can learn more or become smarter if they work hard and persevere—may learn more, learn it more quickly, and view challenges and failures as opportunities to improve their learning and skills” (Partnership, 2013). When reinforced in the classroom and at home, students can continuously grow academically and personally. There are many ways in which parents can emphasize and help build a growth mindset within their children. Some of these ways include:

1.     Embracing Mistakes – Even when students fail at something or may not get to a certain expectation, it is essential to learn the importance of failure. Students learn from the way they complete tasks and determine ways in which they can be altered to get to a different ending. Ideally, students learn from their mistakes when they make it themselves. Students can’t learn when, as parents, we try to teach them what not to do from our own mistakes.

2.     Accepting Challenges – Many students, who may not have a growth mindset, will always tend to accept tasks that are easier, and they know they can complete quickly. Accepting challenges enables them to think outside the box, be creative and even embraces failure. This is their way to learn new things and essentially “grow”.

3.     Asking for Assistance – Sometimes when students are reluctant to ask for help it is because it may show a lack of competency. Many people think that asking for help shows a sign of weakness. On the contrary, asking for help is another sign of learning to grow. Students should neve be afraid to ask questions and ask for help as it shows a sign of curiosity. It also shows a sign of persistence, that they are willing to continuously work hard for what they are trying to accomplish,

4.     Last, but not least, Praise. Praising a child for something they have done well and something that they may have failed in is an important part to the growth mindset. Students see certain things that they do well with but also understand that it is okay to fail. They can learn from those failures and see them as a positive as not a negative. It is important to be specific about what they have done well and provide insight on how or what they may learn from certain experiences. Ultimately, supporting your child will enable them to see that you are always there for them no matter what.

 

 

Partnership, G. S. (2013, May 15). Growth Mindset Definition. Retrieved January 28, 2019, from https://www.edglossary.org/growth-mindset/

Importance of Learning During the Holiday Breaks

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During the winter holiday break, many students and parents take the opportunity to step back from their crazy schedules and focus on their families and being able to enjoy each other’s company. Just like with summer break, it is essential to continue to involve students with different aspects of academia to keep their wondering minds ahead of the game. It is important to stick to routines such a student’s bedtime and daily responsibilities. Being able to stick to the daily routines helps alleviate any difficulties when students return to school in the new year.

There are many ways where students can take a step back from the classroom but still do a tremendous amount of learning within the household. Taking a bit of time each day to read aloud to your child or have them read independently provides students with ways to increase learning, specifically in the comprehension and vocabulary area. This time also enables parents and children to spend quality time together. These learning moments enable parents to connect the home environment to the classroom. Reading and analyzing texts that are grade level or above provide students with deeper understanding of text.

There are other resources outside of the household where students can learn and challenge themselves over the break. Some of these resources include supplemental education, museums or planetariums, and workshops geared towards students. Enrichment programs provide students with challenging yet simplified subjects areas and museums or planetariums making learning fun and hands-on. Museums not only teach students about science and history but make learning a fun, hands on process. Students are involved with aspects such as IMAX movies on planets and nature and look at the evolution of ancient history, bringing those history textbooks to life.

For students to want to learn, you want to make learning fun. Students should take initiative rather then feeling like they must do something because they are being told to do so. Get involved in the learning process with your children. Just as brain drain could happen over the long summer months, it can also happen throughout the winter break. Focus in on what students enjoy doing and make it a fun experience with the ability to learn new things. Sign your children up for culinary classes, technology workshops or different crafting opportunities. Take them to the zoo or aquarium and allow them to experience learning all about the animals and nature all around us. Remember, for learning to be effective, it must be fun.

Practical Actions to Unleash Originality

Adam Grant offers 5 practical actions to unleash originality that you can take. The following extract is taken from his bestseller.

1. Ask children what their role models would do. Children feel free to take initiative when they look at problems through the eyes of originals. Ask children what they would like to improve in their family or schools. Then Have them identify a real person or fictional character they admire for being unusually creative and inventive. What would that person do in this situation? 

2. Link good behaviors to moral character. Many parents and teachers praise helpful actions, but children are more generous when they’re commended for being helpful people-it becomes part of their identity. If you see a child so something good, try saying, “You’re a good person because you _________.” Children are also more ethical when they’re asked to be moral people-they want to earn the identity. If you want a child to share a toy, instead of asking, “Will you share?” ask, “Will you be a sharer?” 

3. Explain how bad behaviors have consequences for others. When children misbehave, help them see how their actions hurt other people. “How do you think this made her feel?” As they consider the negative impact on others, children begin to feel empathy and guilt, which strengthens their motivation to right the wrong-and to avoid the action in the future. 

4. Emphasize values over rules. Rules set limits that teach children to adopt a fixed view of the world. Values encourage children to internalize principles for themselves. When you talk about standards, like the parents of the Holocaust rescuers, describe why certain ideals matter to you and ask children why they’re important. 

5. Create novel niched for children to pursue. Just as laterborns sought out conventional ones were closed to them, there are ways to help children carve out niches. One of my favorite techniques is the Jigsaw Classroom: bring students together for a group project and assign each of them a unique part. For example, when writing a book report on Eleanor Roosevelt’s life, one student worked on her childhood, another on her teenage years, and a third on their role in the women’s movement. Research shows that this reduces prejudice-children learn to value each other’s distinctive strengths. It can also give them the space to consider original idea instead of falling victim to groupthink. To further enhance the opportunity for novel thinking, ask children to consider a difference frame of reference. How would Roosevelt’s childhood have been different if she grew up in China? What battles would she have chosen to fight there?