What is Eye Level Literary Award?

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For more than two decades, Daekyo has been discovering new breeds of writers 
and literary talents through the annual Eye Level Literary Award. 
In recent years, the contest’s focus has shifted to uncovering and 
recognizing talented children from around the world.
Eye Level members and non-members are all invited to showcase their creativity 
and take a step closer to their dreams. The contest is held every summer, and the 
global winners are invited to Korea to attend the Awards Ceremony and travel around Seoul.

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WHO CAN PARTICIPATE?

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All children between
4 to 9 years of age.

Anyone, including non-Eye Level members,
are invited to participate. Participants
will draw about the topic announced
at the start of registration and describe
the drawing in 50 words or less.

2019 Eye Level Oratacular

WHAT IS THE ORATACULAR?

The Eye Level Oratacular is a competition in which members and non-members will learn the process of speech writing and delivery in a fun and motivating environment.

The Oratacular will be held at participating local Eye Level centers. One winner from each center will have the chance to submit a recording of their speech for national judging

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WHO CAN PARTICIPATE

This event is open to all Eye Level members and non-members from 1st through 8th grade. Participants will join the event at a local learning center. Find a center by entering your State HERE.

REGISTRATION

Online Registration: December 3, 2019 – January 20, 2019
Event Date: February 2019 (Date & Time set by each center)
Website: www.oratacular.com
After registering, contact the center to pick up the speech materials and to find out about an in-center workshop.


EVENT PROCESS

AWARDS

One student from each participating Eye Level Learning Center's Oratacular will be selected to submit a video of their speech for national judging. 4 Gold and 8 Silver winners will be awarded for North America. Local prizes will be awarded by the participating center.

  • *All expenses paid for gold winners to attend the camp. No cash value or substitute prizes. 

  • Must be between 3rd & 6th grade to attend Model UN Camp.

  • Gold winners not eligible for camp due to age (not between 3rd & 6th grade) receive $500 USD Award + Trophy

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THANKS TO YOUR PARTICIPATION

For every child that participates in the Oratacular, Eye Level will donate $1 to the National Center for Families Learning.

The National Center for Families Learning works to eradicate poverty through education solutions for families. Partnering with educators, literacy advocates, and policymakers, NCFL develops and provides programming, professional development, and resources that empower and raise families to achieve their potential.

STUDENT VIDEOS:





Practical Actions to Unleash Originality

Adam Grant offers 5 practical actions to unleash originality that you can take. The following extract is taken from his bestseller.

1. Ask children what their role models would do. Children feel free to take initiative when they look at problems through the eyes of originals. Ask children what they would like to improve in their family or schools. Then Have them identify a real person or fictional character they admire for being unusually creative and inventive. What would that person do in this situation? 

2. Link good behaviors to moral character. Many parents and teachers praise helpful actions, but children are more generous when they’re commended for being helpful people-it becomes part of their identity. If you see a child so something good, try saying, “You’re a good person because you _________.” Children are also more ethical when they’re asked to be moral people-they want to earn the identity. If you want a child to share a toy, instead of asking, “Will you share?” ask, “Will you be a sharer?” 

3. Explain how bad behaviors have consequences for others. When children misbehave, help them see how their actions hurt other people. “How do you think this made her feel?” As they consider the negative impact on others, children begin to feel empathy and guilt, which strengthens their motivation to right the wrong-and to avoid the action in the future. 

4. Emphasize values over rules. Rules set limits that teach children to adopt a fixed view of the world. Values encourage children to internalize principles for themselves. When you talk about standards, like the parents of the Holocaust rescuers, describe why certain ideals matter to you and ask children why they’re important. 

5. Create novel niched for children to pursue. Just as laterborns sought out conventional ones were closed to them, there are ways to help children carve out niches. One of my favorite techniques is the Jigsaw Classroom: bring students together for a group project and assign each of them a unique part. For example, when writing a book report on Eleanor Roosevelt’s life, one student worked on her childhood, another on her teenage years, and a third on their role in the women’s movement. Research shows that this reduces prejudice-children learn to value each other’s distinctive strengths. It can also give them the space to consider original idea instead of falling victim to groupthink. To further enhance the opportunity for novel thinking, ask children to consider a difference frame of reference. How would Roosevelt’s childhood have been different if she grew up in China? What battles would she have chosen to fight there?